5 Storytelling Lessons from the Original Star Wars Trilogy :: via litreactor.com

Oh, how I love Star Wars.  The original episodes, not the new junk… I’m not a weirdo.  And I’m so happy to find that someone else uses these Sci-Fi gems as creative fodder.  (Don’t tell anyone, but I base a bunch of my characters on Han Solo.  I just can’t help myself.  I adore him.)  So, here are some takeaways according to one of my favorite writing websites, Lit Reactor.

– sld

:::::

5 Storytelling Lessons from the Original Star Wars Trilogy

by Rajan Khanna

darth-vader-10-most-dangerous-star-wars-villains

Star Wars: The Force Awakens is upon us, and if you’re like me, everywhere you look you see Star Wars—merchandise, promotions, screenings. It’s reminiscent of my childhood. It remains to be seen if the new movie will live up to expectations, but one thing it’s done is bring attention back to the original trilogy which is beloved for many, many reasons. In looking back on those films, there’s a lot to love there, particularly in the storytelling. And no, I’m not talking about the oft-mentioned Joseph Campbell mythological cycle structure. I’m talking about specific storytelling choices that helped make those films memorable. Here are a handful of them.*

1. A Lived-in World

Worldbuilding is important to secondary world stories (which Star Wars is) but it has to be handled deftly. One way to communicate worldbuilding is through exposition. Science fiction and fantasy are rife with bad examples of this, where long sections of text are used to explain elements of the world, or characters pause in the middle of action to deliver long-winded speeches explaining the particulars of a custom or culture or science.

George Lucas, on the other hand, drops us into a fully formed world at the beginning of A New Hope. There’s a history to this world, and the costumes and the environments and the equipment show that. Things look appropriately lived in. Dirty. Aged. It’s clear from the beginning of A New Hope that the gloss of the Old Republic has faded, and that life on the Rim, under the Empire, is hard.

The world is given a sense of depth, but the plot is allowed to move on at a brisk pace and only the elements that truly matter to the story are kept in focus.

What’s more, the movies don’t explain every little thing that is mentioned. The Clone Wars, for example, are mentioned without explanation. We’re introduced to creatures like the Sand People without an in-depth examination of who they are or where they came from. We don’t need to know how Han and Chewie met. So Lucas doesn’t show us. The end result is that the world is given a sense of depth, but the plot is allowed to move on at a brisk pace and only the elements that truly matter to the story are kept in focus. It’s a good lesson to remember that when it comes to worldbuilding, less is often more.

2. Relationships

When talking about writing we talk a lot about plot and character and dialogue and pacing, but one way a lot of those things come together is through character relationships. Relationships can illustrate character, help advance the plot and illustrate themes in fiction. Star Wars uses relationships between characters to great effect. Take, for example, Han Solo and Chewbacca. Chewbacca doesn’t speak (at least not in a way that we understand), but his relationship with Han helps to humanize the smuggler. Even in A New Hope, when Han is his most prickly self, his affection for, and devotion to Chewie, shows that there’s another side to him.

Take any of the relationships in the films — C-3P0’s false outrage with R2, Han’s condescending older brother to Luke, Leia’s response to Han’s advances, the old buddies without trust bond between Lando and Han — all of these help add dimensions to our main characters while also maintaining tension. Few people just love each other in these movies; no one’s about to sing Kumbayah. Even Yoda and Luke, master and apprentice, don’t get along all that well. That helps to keep things realistic while also keeping us guessing.

And of course these relationships change over time. Han and Luke become fast friends by Jedi. Leia and Han admit their true feelings for one another. Han learns to trust Lando again. It’s something the films do really well. And it helps to stress that characters can always redeem themselves. From Han, to Lando, to Vader**, there’s always a chance to change for the better. …

Read the entire article here on Lit Reactor.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s